Lisa Rosenbaum.

Therefore EHRs will be just as good as the quality metrics they’re designed to capture; technology can’t conquer fundamental measurement problems. We measure many things that have no worth to patients, while much of what sufferers do value, including our interest, remains unmeasurable. Why, Wachter asks, perform we do nothing equivalent in health care? In a moving passage, Wachter speaks with a famous surgeon who once spent his evenings before surgery reading his notes on another day’s patients. No longer. His notes have already been rendered homogeneous by the tyranny of clicks and auto-populated fields uselessly. I cannot even picture their faces. The blanks on our screens can be filled with terms, but the process of understanding cannot be auto-populated.The Kaiser Daily Health Policy Report is published for Kaisernetwork.org, a free program of The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Copyright 2009 Advisory Panel Kaiser and Company Family Foundation. All rights reserved.. Anna Bill-Axelson, M.D., Ph.D., Lars Holmberg, M.D., Ph.D., Hans Garmo, Ph.D., Jennifer R. Rider, Sc.D., Kimmo Taari, M.D., Ph.D., Christer Busch, M.D., Ph.D., Stig Nordling, M.D., Ph.D.D., Ph.D., Swen-Olof Andersson, M.D., Ph.D.D., Ph.D.D., Ph.D., Juni Palmgren, Ph.D., Gunnar Steineck, M.D., Ph.D., Hans-Olov Adami, M.D., Ph.D., and Jan-Erik Johansson, M.D., Ph.D.: Radical Prostatectomy or Watchful Waiting around in Early Prostate Cancer The Scandinavian Prostate Tumor Group Study #4 4 , a randomized trial of radical prostatectomy versus watchful waiting in men with localized prostate cancer diagnosed before the era of prostate-specific antigen testing, showed a survival advantage of radical prostatectomy as compared with observation at 15 years of follow-up.